Skip to main content

Sorting the Novel Assortments

This is a short note on one of the more important recent innovations in horology. It pertains to the assortment, which is a collection of parts regulating the release of energy from a watch's mainspring. In detail, the assortment consists of the escape wheel, balance wheel, hairspring, anchor lever (usually) and pallet stones. I've now seen two similar, and major, innovations in this portion of a watch mechanism. I was initially confused about the similarities and differences between these two mechanisms, so I thought I would briefly outline them. Two watches represents the start of a potential trend, so this is probably worth doing.

In 2017, Zenith announced the Defy Lab, a watch (pictured here with a black strap) featuring the wholesale replacement of a traditional assortment with an oscillating wafer of silicon (see picture).
Top: Zenith Defy Inventor, Bottom Left: Zenith Lab,Zenith Bottom Right: Silicon Oscillator Credit: Zenith
The price of this reference, available in only 10 examples, was roughly $30,200. The Zenith oscillator is large in comparison to an assortment, having approximately the same diamater as a dial (in contrast, traditional assortmants can squeeze within a much smaller diameter). In 2019 Zenith "commercialized" this highly limited release with the Defy Innovator (pictured with a blue strap, reference 95.9001.9100/78.R920) priced at $17,900.

The specifications on the Defy Inventor are very impressive and in keeping with Zenith's accomplishments in the field of high frequency movements, such as the El Primero. The oscillator runs at 18 hz (129,600 bph), more than 4.5 times the typical frequency of a mechanical timepiece. As you would expect, this results in enhanced precision. The Defy Inventor was case-tested and chronometer certified by Timelab, with reports of accuracy ranging from .3 to .5 seconds per day. The power reserve is 50 hour. This implementation of a silicon oscillator was created under the leadership of Guy Semon (a PhD holding physicist) in the Research Institute for the Watch Division of LVMH. You can watch a video about the development efforts here.

Despite these advantages, observers did note that something might be lost with the rapidly "quivering" and flashing oscillator visible through the skeletonized dial. Traditional assortments have an almost relaxing and soothing impact on the observer. In contrast, Zenith' oscillator can seem frenetic and less peaceful. There were also rumors that regulating the Defy Lab / Inventor was a challenge for Zenith.

This week, Frederique Constant (FC) introduced three versions of its Slimline Monolithic Manufacture.
The Federic Constant Slimline Monolithic Manufacture.
Interestingly, FC also adopted the silicon oscillator as a replacement of the assortment. In this rendition, though, the oscillator is much smaller in diameter and also features adjustable weights. These, reputedly, make regulation more straightforward. You can see the FC's oscillator through a "heartbeat" window positioned at 6 o'clock on the dial. A watchmaker still requires a special tool to measure the accuracy of the movement. The Slimline Monolithic Manufacture is far more accessible for buyers, with a starting price of approximately $5,276. Amazingly, this movement runs at an even faster pace, at 40 hz (288,000 bph). At more than 10x the frequency of a standard movement, FC claims the Slimline Monolithich Manufacture achieves chronometer-grade accuracy. It's remarkable that FC was able to round out this package with an 80 hour power reserve. Interestingly, FC's version of a silicon oscillator was developed by Flexous, a Dutch startup.

The watch community has not had a chance, yet, to form an impression of the Slimline Monolithic Manufacture "in the metal." The smaller diameter oscillator may help address concerns that this technology is less pleasant to observe "ticking" away. What's remarkable to me is that, approximately three short years ago, a watch with a silicon oscillator was priced at five figures and extremely limited in production. Today, that price has decreased by a whopping 83%. The technology has decreased in size while seemingly improving by a factor of 2x or more (from 18 hz to 40 hz). The innovation has diffused internationally and to another brand. This is an incredibly rapid pace for innovation in the watch industry. It is akin to the type of competition we more often see in semiconductors and computer processors. Also, competition in horological innovation typically does not involve offering more for a lower price. We'll have to stay tuned in order to see if this nascent development transforms into a permanent trend.

Right, the new assortments are sorted.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Whither HODINKEE?

Hey, remember me? Regrettably I've allowed Horolonomics to lay fallow for too long, since earlier this summer really.  I can't exactly explain why, but it is fair to say that the pandemic is at least partially responsible.  I've had quite a few articles I've wanted to post in the interim, but I'm finally awakening from my temporary hibernation in response to pending developments at HODINKEE. As I explained in my interview over at Watchsignals (full disclosure: I'm an official advisor), the good people at HODINKEE set me upon my path as an enthusiast and collector of watches.  I can't exactly remember when I started reading it, I think it was when Kevin Rose joined the team, probably around 2015.  I'd used his first startup "recommendation engine," Digg, and listened to his podcast for a while (Diggnation, which was really fun) and that is when HODINKEE popped on my radar.   It is fair to say that a great deal of the emergent interest in watch

The History of the Radioactive Rolex with One Complication

My family and I have a tradition when we visit the beach. We search for sea glass. When jagged and sharp shards of broken glass land in the ocean the constant sluicing of sand changes them. Over decades or more the edges soften. Clear glass becomes cloudy. Given enough time the entire shape of the glass can morph, from rectangular to ovoid. Each piece of sea glass is inherently unique due to imperceptibly small forces which slowly accumulate, resulting in major changes. We know this is also true of vintage timepieces. After decades lume changes in hue. Dial faces crack, craze and fade. An object which was often mass produced consequently becomes a “pi├Ęce unique.” Watches are engineered to accurately and unchangeably mark the passage of time. We love and value vintage watches for the fact that they are altered by time itself. The story I offer here underwent similar changes. It began as an effort to understand more about an unfinished chapter in the history of Rolex. It b

Scarcity as Strategy in Horology

Watch industry observers have spent a lot of time dissecting the unavailability of steel Rolex sports models this year (submariner, GMT, etc). These timepieces are presently impossible to buy at the manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP). You can acquire them outside official channels but only at a multiple of retail. For one summary of this topic check out episode 48 of Hodinkee radio below. I've listened to a lot of explanations and, frankly, almost all of them miss the point. While I don't know everything I should about perlage I do know something about economics. And economics explains almost everything about this watch industry phenomenon. Horolonomics 101 Rolex is involved in rationing: a shortage which is, for the most part, manufactured and intentional. With this discussion I will explain two things: 1) what rationing does and, 2) why Rolex would do this. The TL;DR on what follows is that the shortage: is inefficient. Creates profit for watch bu