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A Note To Subscribers

Hello!

I apologize if you signed up for email updates on Horolonomics but you haven't received an update since July or so. Google closed a service I was relying upon for those updates and I'm only now figuring out how to transition to a new service. The good news is that my next post is a big one and I figured all this out before that one went live.

This isn't the code I had to fix but it is close.
If you're reading this after receiving an email, I moved your subscription to my new service. Hopefully you are OK with that, if not, you should be able to unsubscribe on the new service. If you have any concerns please DM me on Instagram (@katimepieces) and I will fix things.

Again, my apologies for the delay on fixing this. Horolonomics is a one man operation and sometimes it takes me a while to figure out the magic of tech. As always, thank you so much for reading and spreading the word. It means a TON to me.

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